Who is Amos Meerkat?

Date posted: 18 Nov 2013

Children from rural areas across Namibia are getting a good start at an education thanks to an initiative to start farm schools.

The Amos Meerkat School Project (AMSP) is an initiative by a group of women to train the spouses of farm labourers to become teachers and help their children become school ready. For the past year and a half Hollard Namibia has been involved in the project.

"It’s an exciting project. We are reaching children from three to about eight years old," said Sam Kauapirura, HR executive for Hollard Namibia.

"Hollard Namibia identified this project as an opportunity to make a meaningful contribution to the lives of young Namibians and prepare them for a better tomorrow. We share in the dream to see every farm child reach their full potential," he added.

The project is spearheaded by a group of 10 ladies whose primary responsibility is to develop a curriculum and train the spouses of farm labourers to teach the children.

"The curriculum has been developed to allow semi-literate teachers to give classes. To date over 40 schools have been established across Namibia. A massive training session is being planned for this month to prepare teachers for next year’s intake of pupils," he added.

Kauapirura said the assistance of farm owners has been crucial in the success of the schools. Farm owners are encouraged to provide basic facilities for the schools, on their farms, and lend supervisory support to the teachers.

Hollard Namibia has committed financial assistance towards training material for 40 farm schools at a cost of N$3 000 per school, the training of 48 teachers as well as stationery for the 40 schools.

"We expect this project to grow phenomenally and will continue supporting it," said Sam. "We would also like to create more national awareness about AMSP and encourage our corporate partners to become involved.

"The next step would be to improve the skills of the project captains so that we can take the project to a higher level.

 

Children in one of the farm school classrooms.

 

The teachers, who are all spouses of farm labourers, receive training.

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